Money is a big worry when you’re starting a small business.

The growth of alternative lending gives established companies a wide range of small business loan options. But entrepreneurs might find it hard to get a startup loan. After all, who wants to lend thousands of dollars to a small business that doesn’t even have revenue yet?

“Nobody does a good job of providing financing to startup businesses because it’s the highest risk out there,” says Charles Green, founder of the Small Business Finance Institute. “You may have big ideas and plans in place, but you haven’t launched yet.”

Keep in mind that since you don’t have a business started up yet or you’re just starting out, you likely have to borrow money based on your personal finances. For this reason, you’re more likely to qualify for startup financing with a strong personal credit score (720 or higher).

To raise your credit score fast, check your credit reports for mistakes that could be weighing down your score and dispute them with the credit bureaus, maintain a low balance on your credit cards and stay on top of all of your bills.

SBA loans, and microloans from nonprofits

The U.S. Small Business Administration has a microloan program that offers up to $50,000 for small businesses and some not-for-profit child care centers. The average SBA microloan is about $13,000. Here’s a list of providers.

The downside of the microloan is the “micro” part: Funding may not be sufficient for all borrowers.

The SBA’s flagship 7(a) loan program also offers financing that borrowers can use to start businesses. But 7(a) SBA loans are tough to get. They typically go to established businesses that can provide collateral — a physical asset, such as real estate or equipment, that the lender can sell if you default. The qualifications are strict, and even if you qualify, the process can take several months.

Microlenders and nonprofit lenders can be a less difficult route, especially if you have shaky finances. Many focus on minority or traditionally disadvantaged small-business owners, as well as small businesses in communities that are struggling economically.

Generally, you’ll get solid loan terms from these lenders, making it possible for you to grow your business and establish better credit. That can help you qualify for other types of financing down the road.

Friends and family

Perhaps the most common way of financing a new small business is to borrow money from friends or family. Of course, if your credit is bad — and your family and friends know it — you’ll have to persuade them that you’ll be able to pay them back.

In these situations, the potential cost of failure isn’t just financial; it’s personal.

“Business is personal, regardless of what people say,” says David Nilssen, CEO of Guidant Financial, a small-business financing company. “For most people, it’d be difficult to separate the two.”

Trim your list of friends and family to those who understand your plans, and do your best to make certain they’re comfortable with the risks involved.

Credit cards

Many small-business owners use credit cards for funding. If your credit isn’t stellar, you might be limited to secured credit cards, which typically have higher fees than regular credit cards.

It’s important to remember, however, that credit cards are an expensive way of financing a small business, particularly if you have bad credit. That’s because card issuers determine annual percentage rates based largely on your personal credit scores. And research has shown that small businesses that rely heavily on credit card financing typically fail.

Personal business loans

Many new small-business owners access financing through personal loans, often via a growing number of online lenders. But like credit cards, personal loans can have high APRs, especially for bad credit borrowers.

Personal business loans can be a good option for borrowers with excellent personal credit and strong income.

Nilssen says small-business owners should consider personal loans “an option of last resort.”

“Where they can work,” he says, “is when a business just needs a small amount of money for things like … early-stage production or buying equipment.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *